Corrosion can be catastrophic, but it is not a necessary curse!


Bruce Hinton

Bruce Hinton inspecting the cannons in Halifax, Canada, in 2003Dr. Hinton graduated from the Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering at the University of Queensland in 1968. He joined Aeronautical Research Laboratories at Fishermens Bend in Melbourne in 1969. In 1977 he was awarded an Australian Public Service Scholarship to study for a PhD. in the Corrosion and Protection Centre, University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, England. He has recently retired from the Aeronautical and Maritime Research Laboratory in Melbourne.

 

Dr. Hinton has been involved for over 30 years in research and problem solving in the field of corrosion prevention and control in aircraft structures. During that period he has acted extensively as a consultant to RAAF, RAN and ARMY. His main interests lie in the areas of corrosion inhibition, metal finishing, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatigue and hydrogen embrittlement.

During his career Dr. Hinton has published over 40 refereed journal papers, and over 50 DSTO reports. He has co-authored 3 Patents and delivered and published over 50 Conference Papers.

In 1986 Dr. Hinton was the recipient of the AIMF J. J. Dale Best Research Paper Award. On four occasions he has been the recipient of the Australasian Corrosion Association Marshall Fordham Research Paper Award, and in 1995 he was awarded the Institute of Metals and Materials Australasia, Florence Taylor Medal, for Achievement in Materials Research and Contributions to the Materials Community. In 1996 he was awarded the Corrosion Medal by the Australasian Corrosion Association. Dr. Hinton was invited to present the Annual P.F. Thompson Memorial lecture at the 1999 Conference of the Australasian Corrosion Association